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Deeds Wins

At least one party is courting conservatives. While many Republicans continue to follow the MSM’s (hardly disinterested) advice by rejecting conservative values (BTW, how’s that working?), some Virginia Democrats are appealing to conservative voters by appearing more moderate than their national counterparts. The trend picked up a little more steam tonight, as rural State Senator Creigh Deeds walloped liberals Brian Moran and Terry McAullife in the commonwealth’s Democratic gubernatorial primary. As of this writing, Sen. Deeds has won nearly 50 percent of the vote, performing well in northern as well as rural Virginia. This sets the stage for a rematch between Sen. Deeds and Republican nominee Bob McDonnell, who narrowly defeated the Democrat in a 2005 race for Attorney General. Since Virginia’s races will be in large measure a referendum on President Barack Obama and his unpopular, dangerous policies, the presence of a moderate Democrat at the top of the ticket promises an interesting Fall.

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3 thoughts on “Deeds Wins

  1. You certainly must employ a strange definition of "unpopular." Unlike "dangerous," which is a matter of opinion, "unpopular" is measurable. And the polling data confirms that President Obama's policies are "popular," which hopefully you will recognize as the antonym of "unpopular."

    Although perhaps you only meant to indicate that the policies were unpopular among your readership, your friends and associates, and those around you. If that's the case, I retract my above criticism because you are almost certainly correct. However, I would respectfully point out that the overall electorate of the Commonwealth of Virginia has a somewhat different composition.

  2. "Since Virginia's races will be in large measure a referendum on President Barack Obama and his unpopular, dangerous policies, the presence of a moderate Democrat at the top of the ticket promises an interesting Fall."

    Barack Obama has a 65% approval rating right now, according to Research 2000, and about that with other polling outfits. He won Virginia by about 6%. Why would you possibly want to cast this race as a referendum on Obama?

    Which doesn't make much sense in the first place. 2005 in VA was not a referendum on Bush, and 2001 wasn't either. Hell, in November of 2001 Bush was flying high in the polls but Mark Warner still won. Some states do end up getting their state-level races mixed up with national politics like that, but VA has elections out of synch with federal voting. Neither of these candidates has to appear on a ballot with a President, Senator or Congressman of their own party.

    I think that Virginians usually vote for the governor whom they like better and respect more. They vote for the person who they feel is like them, or is like the way they would like to think of themselves. As much as I'd like to think that my own pet issues are driving the bus, personality and character is what it really comes down to. Can McDonnell do that? I think he has a shot.

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